Top Tourist Attractions in Suriname

There are more than a handful of top tourist attractions in Suriname. Each is unique but together, they reflect three different aspect of Suriname: rich colonial heritage, inborn beauty, and a vibrant culture. No matter where you are in the country, you are bound to bump into more than one of these tourist spots. Suriname is on the northern coast of South American to the east of Venezuela.

View from the Voltzberg in the Central Suriname Nature Reserve

View from the Voltzberg in the Central Suriname Nature Reserve

Nearly one third of Suriname comprises of nature reserves. They serve to protect local flora and fauna. Of the seven nature reserves in the country, Galibi is one of the most popular. It is the nesting site of several species of turtles including endangered ones. The green sea turtle, leatherback, and olive ridley are three types of turtles that can be spotted at the Galibi Nature Reserve. The hawksbill, another kind of turtle, nests in fewer numbers.

The Central Suriname Nature Reserve remains to be the most popular however. More than 1.6 million hectares of forest are under its care. It encompasses the Raleighvallen, Tafelberg, and Eilerts de Hann Gebergte Nature Reserves, featuring great diversity in both wildlife and vegetation. Hundreds of animal and plant species thrive here but two of its most popular attractions are Mount Voltzberg and Releigh Falls.

Completely wooden interior of Saint Peter and Paul Cathedral

Completely wooden interior of Saint Peter and Paul Cathedral

The historic center of Paramaribo is one of the top tourist attractions in Suriname. The UNESCO World Heritage Site features remarkable colonial architecture. Also within the city is the Saint Peter and Paul Cathedral, the largest wooden structure in all of South America. Former coffee and sugar plantations like End of Rest, Rarely Rest, and Struggle Jacobs must also be on your list if you wish to see architectural examples of colonial times. Many of these plantations have been renovated with some of them currently used in producing coffee and dry shrimp. The best way to get around former plantations would be through a bike ride.

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